Here’s Why It’s so Hard to Find Good Movies

Here's Why It's so Hard to Find Good Movies

You know when you get in those funks where you feel like every movie is the same, or pointless, or badly written? You might just be watching a ton of junk on Netflix, but before you judge too harshly you should look at the pile of crap that readers have to whittle down to find good scripts.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/cbP3mgdI4yQ/heres-why-its-so-hard-to-find-good-movies-1470678245
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Driverless cars as life savers, pigeons as pedestrians, lip readers as crime stoppers, and alcoholic

Driverless cars as life savers, pigeons as pedestrians, lip readers as crime stoppers, and alcoholics as city employees. These are just a few of the urban reads on our radar this week.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/OeiglaZcwBA/driverless-cars-as-life-savers-pigeons-as-pedestrians-1467015725
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Panel: Hospitals are just starting to build health IT foundations

Healthcare providers are just beginning to figure out how big data, mobile platforms, and integrated software can deliver better care at lower costs, according to speakers at The Economist’s Health Care Forum in Boston.

Talk of using large-scale data analysis to develop customized treatment plans is premature since most healthcare providers are still edging toward joining the big-data movement, said Charlie Schick, IBM’s director of big data, healthcare and life sciences, during a panel discussion at the Tuesday event.

“The reality is hospitals are early on in analysis maturity,” he said. “They’re trying to answer questions required by the government. Big data is a buzzword.”

To receive government reimbursements to defray the cost of electronic health records (EHR) implementations, hospitals must be able to show how they are using IT to improve patient care.

The Cleveland Clinic, a healthcare provider that records 5.1 million patient visits annually, has been aggregating patient, financial and payer data “for a while” and uses that information to deliver better care and reduce costs, said CIO Martin Harris. Physicians are learning how to use the data to determine what care to provide, which is also a metric used in their annual reviews, he said.

The organization is looking ahead to predictive analytics to manage costs. For instance, patient data shows that people cancel surgical procedures during snowstorms. Using this information, the hospital could expect cancelations during inclement weather and better manage operating rooms, which are one of a hospital’s largest cost centers, Harris said.

To that point, just gathering data doesn’t help medicine, said Iya Khalil, co-founder and executive vice president of GNS Healthcare, a Cambridge, Massachusetts, company that analyzes healthcare data to better match patients and treatments.

“To get value, you need to make sense of the data, not only to predict disease trajectory, but how to intervene to get care and make it cost effective,” said Khalil, who added that her company developed an algorithm for health insurance company Aetna that helps identify people at risk for developing metabolic syndrome.

Gathering this data presents its own set of challenges. Managing chronic illnesses—such as asthma—which contribute to between 60 percent and 70 percent of healthcare costs, requires data from a patient’s personal life, said Harris. Patients may be reluctant to capture data from their homes, especially if it requires using a cumbersome device.

“We need to integrate medicine in that setting rather than a physician’s office. The proper device won’t be a medical device, but will be something like a phone,” he said. “They need to see incentives. We need to get them actively engaged in health care.”

Medical workers are also unsure of the potential value in collecting healthcare data.

“People collecting the data need to see value in the data. That’s not happening,” said Schick.

“Physicians should be knowledge workers in the 21st century,” said Harris. “We need data inputted by people who are closest to it.”

In another panel discussion, August Calhoun, vice president of Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences Services, noted that the top reason doctors and nurses say they avoid using technology is because doing so gets in the way of offering care. That’s because hospitals often lack a solid health IT foundation, he added.

“Most hospitals don’t have connected clinical systems,” he said. Instead, data islands exist, so transferring information between systems requires a USB stick and a walk down the hall.

John Halamka, CIO of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, warned that financial peril awaits hospitals that don’t use data to change their business model to one that is based on quality of care instead of quantity of tests and procedures.

“My fee-for-service business is dead,” he said. “The days of going to the doctor when you are sick are gone.” The future, he said, is in gathering data from many sources and relying on a team of caregivers to leverage that data to provide care before health problems arise.

Halamka’s future also calls for EHRs with better usability and interoperability.

“We have EHRs designed by people who don’t understand the industry,” he said, which contributes to workflows that aren’t friendly to how doctors work and that, for instance, complicate simple procedures like ordering aspirin.

EHR vendors lack incentives to make their systems work with outside applications. Most have closed APIs (application programming interfaces), making the barriers very high for companies that want to develop applications that work with software from major vendors.

“It will take legislative action to open these legacy systems up,” said Halamka. He likened the current state of EHR interoperability to Apple only allowing applications it developed to work on iPhones.

Despite the walled-garden nature of EHRs, hospitals are inclined to keep existing systems given the substantial sums they invested in the software.

“Ripping that out isn’t possible,” Calhoun said.

While studies have found that EHR adoption remains sluggish, Halamka said that during the past four years it anecdotally seems to him that EHR usage has doubled in the U.S. Adoption hasn’t been even across the country, but progress is being made, he added.

Just trading paper records for their digital counterparts can save hospitals money before quality of care is discussed, Calhoun said. For instance, 30 percent of tests that are ordered are duplications because the tests have already been done. EHRs can identify such duplication and cut wasteful spending.

However, health IT won’t replace every piece of paper.

“Paperless hospitals are as likely as paperless bathrooms,” Halamka said.

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Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2063360/panel-hospitals-are-just-starting-to-build-health-it-foundations.html#tk.rss_all
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The winner of our #iMoreAir contest is revealed!

If there’s one thing iMore loves even more than all the iThings, it’s giving fantastic prizes to our awesome readers. This week we have a brand new iPad Air going out to one lucky iMore Twitter follower! I’m sure you’re all anxious to see who the randomator has selected so let’s get to it.

    



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New guidelines for preventing heart attack, stroke

The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology have issued the first new guidelines in a decade for preventing heart attacks and strokes. Among other things, they call for twice as many Americans — one-third of all adults — to consider taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs.

WHAT’S NEW

The guidelines take aim at strokes, not just heart attacks. They’re personalized for men and women, and blacks and whites. They estimate a person’s risk in a novel way and change the goal of treating high cholesterol.

ESTIMATING RISK

A new formula includes age, sex, race, blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes and smoking. People ages 40 to 79 should get an estimate every four to six years. If risk is still unclear, family history or three other tests can be considered. The best one is a coronary artery calcium test, an X-ray to measure calcium in heart arteries.

CHOLESTEROL

High cholesterol leads to hardened arteries, which can cause a heart attack or stroke. Most cholesterol is made by the liver, so diet changes have a limited effect, and many people need medicines to lower their risk.

The guidelines don’t change the definition of high cholesterol, but they say doctors should no longer aim for a specific number with whatever drugs can get a patient there. The new advice stresses statins such as Lipitor and Zocor; most are generic and cost as little as a dime a day.

WHO NEEDS TREATMENT?

Four groups are targeted:

—People who already have heart disease (clogged arteries).

—Those whose LDL, or “bad cholesterol,” is 190 or higher, usually because of genetic risk.

—People ages 40 to 75 with Type 2 diabetes.

—People ages 40 to 75 who have an estimated 10-year risk of heart attack or stroke of 7.5 percent or higher, based on the new formula. (This means that for every 100 people with a similar risk profile, seven to eight would have a heart attack or a stroke within 10 years.)

THE BOTTOM LINE

About one-third of U.S. adults — 44 percent of men and 22 percent of women — would have enough risk to consider a statin. Only 15 percent of adults do now.

THE ROLE OF LIFESTYLE

Guidelines also recommend 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise three to four times a week. They call for a “dietary pattern” that is focused on vegetables, fruits and whole grains and includes low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, beans and healthy oils and nuts. Limit sweets, sweet drinks, red meat, saturated fat and salt.

To fight obesity, doctors should develop individualized weight-loss plans including a moderately reduced-calorie diet, exercise and behavior strategies. The best plans offer two to three in-person meetings a month for at least six months. Web or phone-based programs are a less ideal option.

___

Online:

Risk formula: http://my.americanheart.org/cvriskcalculator

Guidelines on cholesterol: http://bit.ly/1j2hDpH

Lifestyle: http://bit.ly/16ZnV7e

Overweight: http://bit.ly/1bsdFG2

Risk Assessment: http://bit.ly/19hzaV9

Cholesterol info: http://tinyurl.com/2dtc5vy

Heart facts: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/127/1/e6

___

Marilynn Marchione can be followed at http://twitter.com/MMarchioneAP

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/bbd825583c8542898e6fa7d440b9febc/Article_2013-11-12-Heart%20Disease-New%20Guidelines-Glance/id-df08516c188f40e0adfb7842d6ad6bb1
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‘Ender’s Game’ blasts to top of weekend box office

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Weekend moviegoers chose sci-fi over slapstick.

“Ender’s Game” scored the No. 1 slot at the weekend box office, earning $28 million in its opening weekend and sending “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” into second place, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Lionsgate’s adaptation earned an additional $2 million in five international territories.

Based on the novel by Orson Scott Card, “Ender’s Game” stars Asa Butterfield and Harrison Ford as intergalactic soldiers.

Comments made by Card expressing opposition to gay marriage led some to call for a boycott of the film. But a strong first-place opening met the studio’s pre-weekend expectations.

However, ticket sales didn’t come close to the opening weekends of other young-adult adaptations such as “Twilight” and “The Hunger Games.” It did fare better than “Beautiful Creatures” and “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones.”

“‘Ender’s Game’ is a big budget movie that could be the start of a franchise,” said box-office analyst Paul Dergarabedian of Rentrak. “This time of year is not exactly a hotbed of million-dollar openings, but once they launch worldwide, it will do well.”

A representative for Lionsgate declined to be interviewed for this story.

Paramount’s candid-camera comedy starring Johnny Knoxville disguised as an old man brought in an additional $20.5 million in its second weekend, with a domestic total reaching more than $62 million. It also picked up $6 million in international ticket sales.

Other films opening this weekend didn’t generate as much enthusiasm.

CBS Films’ “Last Vegas,” featuring an all-star cast of silver screen veterans including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline, opened in third place, with $16.5 million.

“It’s interesting to see the number of stars that are not in their 20s in the top films,” Dergarabedian said. “‘Ender’s Game’ has Harrison Ford and Viola Davis, and ‘Last Vegas’ is like a ‘Hangover’ for the older crowd. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney (in ‘Gravity’) appeal to an older audience, and ’12 Years a Slave,’ which continues to impress as it expands into more and more theaters, is a very sophisticated drama.”

Relativity Media’s 3-D animated kiddie flick “Free Birds,” with characters voiced by Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson and Amy Poehler, debuted in the fourth spot, with $16.2 million.

After its fifth weekend at the box office, the Warner Bros. 3-D stunner “Gravity” is still holding in the fifth position. It banked $13.1 million over the weekend, bringing its domestic total to $220 million. Internationally, it gained $27.1 million.

Considered an Oscar contender, “12 Years a Slave” earned $4.6 million at No. 7 in its third weekend.

Overseas, Disney’s “Thor: The Dark World” earned an impressive $109.4 million in its first international weekend. The Marvel superhero sequel opens domestically next weekend.

With the opening of “Thor: The Dark World,” Disney’s cumulative international box office for 2013 has passed the studio’s previous international record of $2.303 billion, which was set in 2010.

___

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Rentrak. Where available, latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. “Ender’s Game,” $28 million ($2 million international).

2. “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” $20.5 million ($6 million international).

3. “Last Vegas,” $16.5 million.

4. “Free Birds,” $16.2 million.

5. “Gravity,” $13.1 million ($27.1 million international).

6. “Captain Phillips,” $8.5 million ($10 million international).

7. “12 Years a Slave,” $4.6 million.

8. “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” $4.2 million ($11.5 million international).

9. “Carrie,” $3.4 million ($1.6 million international).

10. “The Counselor,” $2.3 million ($2.6 million international).

___

Estimated weekend ticket sales Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada) for films distributed overseas by Hollywood studios, according to Rentrak:

1.”Thor: The Dark World,” $109.4 million.

2.”Gravity,” $27.1 million.

3.”Sole a Catinelle,” $18.5 million.

4.”Turbo,” $12.3 million.

5.”Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” $11.5 million.

6.”Stalingrad,” $11 million.

7.”Captain Phillips,” $10 million.

8.”Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” $6 million.

9.”Escape Plan,” $4.4 million.

10.”Ender’s Game,” $2 million.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jessica Herndon on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/SomeKind

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by News Corp.; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/enders-game-blasts-top-weekend-box-office-182021622–finance.html
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6 world powers sit with Iran in nuclear talks

A general view shows participants before the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

A general view shows participants before the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton, left, speaks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, right, during a photo opportunity prior the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif waits for the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman arrives prior to the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton, right, walks next to Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, left, during a photo opportunity prior to the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. Six world powers are dangling the prospect of easing some sanctions against Iran if Tehran agrees to curb work that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Talks resume Thursday between Iran and the six _ The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini)

(AP) — Iran and six world powers faced a tough task at the negotiating table Thursday: moving from broad discussions about a nuclear deal to specific steps limiting Tehran’s ability to make atomic weapons in exchange for relief from sanctions that are crippling the Iranian economy.

The last round three weeks ago reached agreement on a framework of possible discussion points. The two sides kicked off Thursday’s round focused on getting to a “first step.” That is described by Western negotiators as an initial curb on uranium enrichment and other activities.

Tehran says it needs to do this work for peaceful purposes, but it also can be used to arm warheads with fissile material.

The initial encounter broke about an hour after it began, possibly to allow consideration of ideas presented by the two sides. European Union spokesman Michael Mann called it a “good opening session.”

The current two-day round follows negotiations three weeks ago that were described by both sides as promising, while falling short of advancing ether Iran’s or the six powers’ concrete demands.

Before the talks, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met with top EU diplomat Catherine Ashton, who is convening the meeting, in what Mann described as good discussions. He said the two agreed to meet again in the afternoon.

Asked afterward about the chances of agreement on initial steps this week, Zarif told reporters: “If everyone tries their best, we may have one.”

After nearly a decade of deadlock, Iran seems more amenable to making concessions to the six countries — the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. New reformist President Hassan Rouhani has indicated he could cut back on the nuclear program in exchange for an easing of sanctions.

But factions both in Iran and in the United States are demanding their own interests be met first — and fast. Iranian hard-liners want significant sanctions reductions in exchange for scaling back enrichment, while some U.S. lawmakers want the enrichment to stop altogether in exchange for loosening sanctions.

Officials from two of the delegations negotiating with the Iranians said the sanctions relief on offer will be limited and is unlikely to affect the core sanctions on Iran’s oil and finance sectors unless Tehran makes sweeping concessions, which it is unlikely to do at this meeting.

The negotiators might also test Iran’s commitment by waiting — possibly for as long as six months — after an agreement before applying sanctions relief. And the sanctions could be easily reapplied should Iran renege on commitments it makes in Geneva.

The officials demanded anonymity as the condition for discussing details of the closed negotiations.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/cae69a7523db45408eeb2b3a98c0c9c5/Article_2013-11-07-Iran-Nuclear-Talks/id-d3284fbeff3447d4b89516ac012eec4e
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Syrian Humanitarian Crisis As Bad As Rwanda?

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Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=242990495&ft=1&f=1001
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Engadget Podcast 367 – 10.31.13

Your well-rested host, Brian Heater is back from his sabbatical and he’s joined by Dana Wollman and Joseph Volpe to talk about Google’s timely Halloween release of Android 4.4 KitKat, Sony’s new SmartWatch 2 and the benefits of having a curved smartphone. No one dressed up for the holiday, but if …

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10 common tasks for MongoDB

My company has been big into MongoDB over the past year. We’ve seen all kinds of MongoDB projects that we or our partners have worked on, so I figured it was worth stuffing them into a top 10 list, with the intent to enlighten those who still want to know which tasks might be best handled by the document flavor of NoSQL databases. The jobs we’ve encountered break down along these lines:

1. Profiles of people
Yes, LDAP is fine for identity when you’re authenticating or authorizing, but what about profiling things or people that aren’t strongly associated with the system? What about criminal records or child support suspects or customer rewards? What about users of promotions and what they clicked on? There’s always new data to add to the user’s profile, from the usual top-level stuff (phone, address, email, etc.) to information a layer below (i.e., phone type). Other database types haven’t evolved fast enough to capture the hundred ways we contact each other or the dozens of ways we pay for things.

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2. Product/catalog data
Way back when, I worked for a cell phone manufacturer (or two) and later a chemical company. Each had a weird version of the same problem: Products were composed of other products, and which products those were composed of changed over time and tended to have more than one brand or identifier. Capturing the thing that contains the thing that contains the thing is much simpler in a document database than in some other database types.

3. Geospatial data
This isn’t necessarily because MongoDB is a great document database, but because it has specific geospatial features. Either way, MongoDB is your friend, whether you’re calculating your bike ride distance or figuring out geospecific information about your customers.

4. Funds, mutual funds, etc.
The finance industry is complicated, so don’t make it more complicated than it needs to be. Investment vehicles often are composed of other investment vehicles, which are then composed of other investment vehicles. Whether this is a “bandwidth” fund or a mutual fund or a fund of funds, if you’re trying to perform while flattening the data out, you may suffer. Heck, the industry is full of documents that contain documents that contain documents, so why not use a document database?

5. Metadata
As Forrest Gump said, “it happens,” and then you have lots of it. You need to categorize and say what “it” is like. MongoDB does this well. There are other database types that will also work (i.e., graph databases), but MongoDB is a fine choice.

6. Talk
People are social creatures, and over the last decade or so we’ve generated exabytes of social data. Mongo is a fine choice to handle the load. Often, people talk topically, with a lot of associated metadata. MongoDB is good for storing that too.

7. Content
They don’t call MongoDB a “document” database for nothing. It’s great for serving up text and HTML, as well as for storing and indexing content and controlling its structure.

8. Games
You have to water those flowers or serve those restaurant patrons or grow your vegetables or kill zombies or whatever. Games have goals, which consist of multiple objectives obtained through achievement or paying your way out. Whether it’s a titanium rake or a BFG 9000, MongoDB can handle the concurrency and save the (often multi-level) data.

9. Events
MongoDB may not be the only game in town with regards to event logging, but it’s a perfectly good choice that won’t slow you down.

10. Bills/invoices
Orders have line items containing product data. The order is also sent to a location and billed to another location. This is how it is and always has been. Orders also progress through many states. You might freak over the idea of a NoSQL database doing “transactions,” but Mongo can perform these as discrete operations if you’ve properly designed your document. MongoDB can handle the concurrency, can efficiently “add one more,” and can track the changes as the bill of sale moves through the system.

What kinds of projects are you doing with MongoDB? Where have you found it to be perfectly suitable, and where have you decided something else was better? Let me know in the comments.

This article, “10 common tasks for MongoDB,” was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Keep up on the latest developments in application development, and read more of Andrew Oliver’s Strategic Developer blog at InfoWorld.com. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/d/application-development/10-common-tasks-mongodb-229839?source=rss_infoworld_blogs
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